Updates 5-9-2018

Blasphemed Mark 3:22-30 Complete in definition here because most Preachers water it down—Webster’s then full Biblical Composite definition

BLASPHEME Webster’s – (1profane or contemptuous speech, writing, or action concerning God or anything held as divine

(2any remark or action held to be irreverent or disrespectful SYN.—blasphemy, the strongest of the following terms, is used esp. of any remark deliberately mocking or contemptuous of God; profanity extends the concept to irreverent remarks referring to any person or thing regarded as sacred; swearing and cursing, in this connection, both refer to the utterance of profane oaths and imprecations, the latter, esp., to the calling down of evil upon someone or something

 

                                      Full Biblical Composite Definition Since Jesus was God’s Son 

                                               And the direct representative, the things spoken against him may also properly be defined as blasphemy.

Examples

Denying (or rejecting) The Real Jesus is Blasphemous--God and his Standards never Changes-Malachi/3-6-- Mark 3:22-30-- Read In Context

 

Teaching False Doctrines--Doing that is Blaspheming against the Holy Spirit- -HOW SO? Teaching God the Son

GodtheSon

Blaspheming—Why.  

Because the Holy Spirit produces qualities that are expressive of our heavenly Father's personality, when we grieve it we grieve,

or sadden, him—something we surely do not want to do- Eph. 4:30 , First- century Jewish scribes sinfully accused Jesus' miracles were done

 my Satan and Jesus said to them--You Blasphemed The Holy Spirit. Read Mark 3:22-30 Read open In Context

Those enemies of Christ blasphemed against the Holy Spirit' and thus committed sin that was unforgivable.

May we never end up that way! Blasphemous.htm.

 

Mark 3:29 Reads but whoever * blasphemes against the Holy Spirit never * * has forgiveness,

but is guilty of an eternal sin. Open and Study AAIsJesusRealToYouPart2.htm

 

                          A false R694 witness will not go unpunished--Prov 19:5

 Rev 21:8 Reads "But for the cowardly and unbelieving and abominable and murderers and immoral persons and sorcerers and idolaters

 and all liars, their part will be in the lake that burns with fire and brimstonewhich is the second death."

 

 

If a person believes a lie and then teaches that lie to others that person make themselves a liar

Open Lies for a list of the most common Lies of Christendom Theologians state some as Holy Truth..

Compare--- Rev-21-7-8-9-10-plus.htm

 

                                                                                                     Get This

"But whoever R366 denies F226 Me before men, I will also deny him before My Father who is in heaven.

 

DenyingJesus.htm and DenyingJesusLife.htm  is  Blasphemous.htm

Do not grieve the Holy Spirit of God, by whom you were sealed for the day of redemptionEph. 4:30

 

                                                         Any person

According to these verses anyone who believe Jesus is God or the second person of the unholy Trindirty

Doctrine denies the Real Jesus and that is Blasphemous against the Holy Spirit–Teachings---of demons to will get

them killed at the great tribulation for believing Lies.htm  2-Thess-2-3-15.htm 2-Thess-1-6-9-plus.htm 2001Jn17-1-3.htm Rev-21-7-8-9-10-plus.htm

 

                                                 The Trindirty doctrine makes Jesus not real open TheEVILSideOFTheTRINITY.htm   

                                  For Satan’s Earthly Ministers Open 2-Cor-11-4-15.htm

 

American Standard Version
For I, Jehovah, change not; therefore ye, O sons of Jacob, are not consumed.
 http://bible.cc/malachi/3-6.htm

<< Malachi 3:6 >>

 

 

The Reason Why Most Churches Teach People That Jesus Is GodStudy 58.htm

 WHOSLyingJesusAndTheHolySpiritOrTheNiceneCreeds.htm-& BiblesTwoTypes.htm

 

Numbers 23:19 "God is not a man, that He should lie, Nor a son of man, that He should repent; Has He said, and will He not do it? Or has He spoken, and will He not make it good?


James 1:17 Every good thing given and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shifting shadow. (NASB ©1995)

 

 

 

Understanding-John-17-3-John-John-1-1-and-more--For-Salvation.htm

 

Commentary

Since Jesus was God’s Son and direct representative, the things spoken against him may also properly be defined as blasphemy. (Lu 22:65) So, too, since the holy spirit or active force emanates from God and is intimately connected with God’s person, Jesus could speak of “blasphemy against the spirit.” This is stated to be the unforgivable sin. (Mt 12:31; Mr 3:28, 29; Lu 12:10) Blasphemy is shown to originate within one’s heart (Mt 15:19Mr 7:21, 22); hence the heart condition, manifest in the willfulness involved, must relate to such blasphemy against the spirit. The incident that led to Jesus’ statement concerning the unpardonableness of such sin demonstrates that it refers to opposing the operation of God’s spirit. This would not be because of deception, human weakness, or imperfection; but the opposition would be willful and deliberate. The Pharisees clearly saw God’s spirit at work in Jesus to accomplish good, yet for selfish reasons they attributed this power to Beelzebub, Satan the Devil, thereby blaspheming God’s holy spirit.—Mt 12:22-32; compare Heb 6:4-6; 10:26, 27.

Like Jesus, Stephen was martyred on a charge of blasphemy. (Ac 6:11-13; 7:56-58) Paul, as Saul, had been a blasphemer and had tried to force Christians to make “a recantation” (literally, “to blaspheme”). However, upon becoming a disciple himself, he suffered blasphemous contradictions from the Jews, and in Ephesus his teaching was possibly labeled by certain elements as blasphemous against the goddess Artemis. (Ac 13:4519:37; 26:11; 1Ti 1:13) By a disfellowshipping, Paul handed Hymenaeus and Alexander “over to Satan that they may be taught by discipline not to blaspheme.” (1Ti1:20; compare 2Ti 2:16-18.) James showed that the rich, as a class, were prone to “blaspheme the fine name” by which the disciples were called. (Jas 2:6, 7; compare Joh 17:6; Ac 15:14.) In “the last days” blasphemers would abound (2Ti 3:1, 2), as the book of Revelation also foretells by statement and by symbol.—Re 13:1-6; 16:9-11, 21; 17:3.

 

Whole Article

BLASPHEMY

This is the anglicized form of the Greek word bla·sphe·mi′a. The Greek term basically means injurious, defamatory, or abusive speech and was used with reference to such speech whether directed against God or against humans. (Compare Re 16:11; Mt 27:39.) The English word “blasphemy,” however, is usually restricted to irreverent or abusive speech against God and sacred things. It is thus the antithesis of words of worship directed to the Divine Being.—See ABUSIVE SPEECH.

In view of the name Di·a′bo·los (meaning “Devil” or “Slanderer”) given to him, it is evident that the first one guilty of blasphemy was God’s original adversary. Though his speech to Eve in Eden was veiled and subtle, it, nevertheless, portrayed the Creator as untruthful. (Ge 3:1-5) Satan has been, therefore, the prime instigator of blasphemy from then till now.—Joh 8:44-49.

The “calling on the name of Jehovah” that started in the time of Enosh during the pre-Flood period must not have been of an upright and proper nature, for Abel long before that had undoubtedly been directing himself to God by the divine name. (Ge 4:26; Heb 11:4) If, as some scholars hold, this calling on God’s name was in the sense of misusing it and improperly applying Jehovah’s name to humans or to idolatrous objects, then this would constitute a blasphemous act.—See ENOSH, ENOS.

Faithful Job was concerned lest his children had at some time “cursed God in their heart” by sinful thoughts; and, when made to undergo great adversity, Job himself “did not sin or ascribe anything improper to God” in spite of the Adversary’s blasphemous attempts to cause him to ‘curse God to his very face.’ (Job 1:5, 11, 20-22; 2:5-10) Job’s three companions, either wittingly or unwittingly, misrepresented God and ‘pronounced God wicked,’ while insinuating that Job had spoken and acted blasphemously.—Job 15:6, 25; 32:3; 42:7, 8.

Blasphemy Under the Law Covenant. The first three commandments of the “Ten Words,” or Ten Commandments, set forth Jehovah God’s unique position as Universal Sovereign and his exclusive right to worship, warning also: “You must not take up the name of Jehovah your God in a worthless way, for Jehovah will not leave the one unpunished who takes up his name in a worthless way.” (Ex 34:28; 20:1-7) Calling down evil upon God and cursing a chieftain were condemned. (Ex 22:28) Thereafter the first recorded instance of spoken blasphemy was that of a son of mixed parentage who, in a struggle with an Israelite man, “began to abuse the Name and to call down evil upon it.” Jehovah decreed the penalty of death by stoning for the offender, and He established this as the due punishment for any future “abuser of Jehovah’s name,” whether a native Israelite or an alien resident among them.—Le 24:10-16.

Soon afterward the great majority of Israelites became guilty of disrespectful murmuring against Jehovah. As a result, they were sentenced to wander 40 years in the wilderness, and those from 20 years old upward were sentenced to die there. (Nu 14:1-4, 11, 23, 29; De 1:27, 28, 34-39) Their blasphemous attitude brought them to the point of talking of stoning God’s faithful servants. (Nu 14:10) While the abusive speech of KorahDathan, and Abiram was actually directed against God’s representatives, Moses and Aaron, yet, prior to God’s execution of these men and those of their households before their tents, Moses told those observing: “You will then know for certain that these men have treated Jehovah disrespectfully,” by disdaining his theocratic appointments.—Nu 16:1-3, 30-35.

Even where there were no spoken expressions against God, one’s actions against the laws of God’s covenant evidently could amount to “speaking abusively of Jehovah” or a blaspheming of him. Thus, while merciful consideration was given to the unintentional violator of God’s law, the individual committing deliberate, willful offenses, whether native Israelite or alien resident, was to be put to death as having spoken abusively of Jehovah and as having despised his word and commandment.—Nu 15:27-31; compare De 31:20; Ne 9:18, 26.

Other acts of blasphemy recorded in the Hebrew Scriptures were those of priest Eli’s sons (1Sa 3:12, 13) and that of the pagan Assyrian official Rabshakeh. (2Ki 19:4-6, 22, 23) Innocent Naboth was convicted of blasphemy and put to death on the basis of testimony by false witnesses. (1Ki 21:10-13) In later times, God condemned the false prophets who reassured those disrespectful of Jehovah. (Jer23:16, 17) Jehovah gave positive warning that his reproachers would be rendered their due reward “into their own bosom.” (Isa 65:6, 7; compare Ps 10:13; Isa 8:20-22.) Because of Israel’s apostate course, Jehovah’s name came under reproach among the nations.—Isa 52:4, 5; Eze 36:20, 21.

In time rabbinic teaching fostered the erroneous view that Leviticus 24:10-23 prohibited as blasphemous the very pronunciation of the name Jehovah. Talmudic tradition also prescribed that when the religious judges heard testimony setting forth blasphemous words supposedly used by the accused, they were to rend their garments, following the example at 2 Kings 18:37; 19:1-4.—The JewishEncyclopedia, 1976, Vol. III, p. 237; compare Mt 26:65.

“Blasphemy” in the Greek Scriptures. The apostle Paul showed the basic meaning of bla·sphe·mi′a by using the related Greek verb bla·sphe·me′o at Romans 2:24 when quoting from Isaiah 52:5 and Ezekiel 36:20, 21, cited above.

Blasphemy includes the act of claiming the attributes or prerogatives of God, or ascribing these to another person or thing. (Compare Ac 12:21, 22.) The Jewish religious leaders accused Christ Jesus of blasphemy because he said that the sins of certain persons were forgiven (Mt 9:2, 3; Mr 2:5-7; Lu 5:20, 21), and they tried to stone him as a blasphemer because of his declaring himself to be God’s Son. (Joh 10:33-36) When Jesus made a statement to the Sanhedrin concerning God’s purpose toward him and the high position to be granted him, the high priest ripped his garments and accused Jesus of blasphemy, for which Jesus was condemned as worthy of death. (Mt 26:63-66; Mr 14:61-64) Having no authority from the Romans to implement the death sentence, the Jewish religious leaders shrewdly changed their accusation of blasphemy to that of sedition when taking Jesus before Pilate.—Joh 18:29–19:16.

Since Jesus was God’s Son and direct representative, the things spoken against him may also properly be defined as blasphemy. (Lu 22:65) So, too, since the holy spirit or active force emanates from God and is intimately connected with God’s person, Jesus could speak of “blasphemy against the spirit.” This is stated to be the unforgivable sin. (Mt 12:31; Mr 3:28, 29; Lu 12:10) Blasphemy is shown to originate within one’s heart (Mt 15:19Mr 7:21, 22); hence the heart condition, manifest in the willfulness involved, must relate to such blasphemy against the spirit. The incident that led to Jesus’ statement concerning the unpardonableness of such sin demonstrates that it refers to opposing the operation of God’s spirit. This would not be because of deception, human weakness, or imperfection; but the opposition would be willful and deliberate. The Pharisees clearly saw God’s spirit at work in Jesus to accomplish good, yet for selfish reasons they attributed this power to Beelzebub, Satan the Devil, thereby blaspheming God’s holy spirit.—Mt 12:22-32; compare Heb 6:4-6; 10:26, 27.

Like Jesus, Stephen was martyred on a charge of blasphemy. (Ac 6:11-13; 7:56-58) Paul, as Saul, had been a blasphemer and had tried to force Christians to make “a recantation” (literally, “to blaspheme”). However, upon becoming a disciple himself, he suffered blasphemous contradictions from the Jews, and in Ephesus his teaching was possibly labeled by certain elements as blasphemous against the goddess Artemis. (Ac 13:4519:37; 26:11; 1Ti 1:13) By a disfellowshipping, Paul handed Hymenaeus and Alexander “over to Satan that they may be taught by discipline not to blaspheme.” (1Ti1:20; compare 2Ti 2:16-18.) James showed that the rich, as a class, were prone to “blaspheme the fine name” by which the disciples were called. (Jas 2:6, 7; compare Joh 17:6; Ac 15:14.) In “the last days” blasphemers would abound (2Ti 3:1, 2), as the book of Revelation also foretells by statement and by symbol.—Re 13:1-6; 16:9-11, 21; 17:3.

From WT Insight book V/1

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