PresenceOrComing          Presence, Coming or Nearness

Based on research of the Aramaic texts 2001 Translation have added and/or revised the following paragraphs of our linked document Coming, Presence, or Nearness –

- Compare all Bibles In Commentaries.htm  http://simplebibletruths.net/DictionaryExample.htm  See Below

 

Well, some Bibles have translated the word parousias at Matthew 24:3 as coming, but the problem with this is that the Greek word for coming is erchomenon so that really isn’t the proper translation. However, if you look at the Hebrew and Aramaic texts, you’ll see that the words he spoke in either language translate as coming or arrival. So, although much has been written about the meaning and significance of parousias, that probably wasn't the word that Jesus used, for he likely spoke in Aramaic.

Another Bible translates parousias as presence, which is good, because the English word presence is derived from parousias. So, we would then assume that the Apostles were asking Jesus when he would be present, not just when he was on his way (coming). But is that what the Apostles meant when they asked that question? Not if you read what was written in the accounts of Mark and Luke. For in Mark they asked when these things were about to be, and in Luke they asked what the signs were when it was about to begin. In other words, they were asking what the signs would be when the things that Jesus was foretelling (and of his coming) were about to happen.

As further proof, note that in the Aramaic text of Mark, Jesus is quoted as saying, ‘Tell us when these things will happen and what is the sign that these things are near and all these things will be fulfilled?’ And in Luke he was quoted as saying, ‘When will these things be, and what is the sign that these things are near to happening?

Also, notice Jesus’ words at Matthew 24:33, where he said, ‘Likewise, when you see all these things [happening], know that he’s near – at the doors.’ So, the signs that Jesus gave weren’t the signs of the end, but of when they were ‘about to end.’ And when these signs were seen, Jesus would be ‘near’ and about to ‘come’ (or enter) to bring destruction. From (http://www.2001translation.com/Presence.htm):

 

Matt 24:3

As He was sitting on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to Him privately *, saying, "Tell us, when will these things happen, and what will be the sign of Your coming, and of the end of the age ?"

Kaqhmenou (5740) de autou epi tou Orouv twn Elaiwn proshlqon (5656) autw| oi maqhtai kat' idian legontev, (5723) Eipe (5628) hmin pote tauta estai, (5704) kai ti to shmeion thv shv parousiav kai sunteleiav tou aiwnov. 

BCC -> Commentary on 24:3
DSN -> Synopsis on 24:3
GEB -> Study Notes on 24:3
GSB -> Study Notes on 24:3
JFB -> Commentary on 24:3
MHC-COM -> Commentary on 24:3
MHC-CON -> Commentary on 24:3
PNT -> Commentary on 24:3
RWP -> Study Notes on 24:3
SRN -> Study Notes on 24:3
TFG -> Commentary on 24:3
TSK -> Commentary on 24:3 TSK -> Entry for 24:3
WEN -> Notes on 24:3
NTB -> Earth; Jesus, The Christ (continued); Olives, Mount Of; Sign
TTT -> Christ, the Prophet; Prophets; Second Coming of Christ, The
EBD -> Revelation of Christ
WJD -> Devotional using 24:3
WJD -> Devotional using 24:3
WJD -> Devotional using 24:3
WJD -> Devotional using 24:3

 

 

Burton Coffman
 · Darby's Synopsis
 · Gill's Exposition
 · Jamieson, Fausset, Brown
 · Matthew Henry Complete
 · Matthew Henry Concise
 · People's New Testament
 · Robertson's Word Pictures
 · Scofield Reference Notes
 · The Fourfold Gospel
 · Treasury of Scripture
 · Wesley's Explanatory Notes

 

 

Matt 24:33

so, you too, when you see all these things, recognize that He is near, right at the door.

outwv kai umeiv, otan idhte (5632) panta tauta, ginwskete (5719) oti egguv estin (5748) epi quraiv. 

 

BCC -> Commentary on 24:33
DSN -> Synopsis on 24:33
GEB -> Study Notes on 24:33
GSB -> Study Notes on 24:33
JFB -> Commentary on 24:33
MHC-COM -> Commentary on 24:33
MHC-CON -> Commentary on 24:33
PNT -> Commentary on 24:33
RWP -> Study Notes on 24:33
TSK -> Commentary on 24:33 TSK -> Entry for 24:33
WEN -> Notes on 24:33
NTB -> Israel, Prophecies Concerning; Jesus, The Christ (continued)
TTT -> Christ, the Prophet; Parables; Second Coming of Christ, The
WJD -> Devotional using 24:33
WJD -> Devotional using 24:33

 

Burton Coffman
 · Darby's Synopsis
 · Geneva Study Bible
 · Jamieson, Fausset, Brown
 · Matthew Henry Complete
 · Matthew Henry Concise
 · People's New Testament
 · Robertson's Word Pictures
 · Treasury of Scripture
 · Wesley's Explanatory Notes

1 Cor 15:23

But each in his own order: Christ the first fruits, after that those who are Christ's at His coming,

ekastov de en tw| idiw| tagmati; aparxh Xristov, epeita oi tou Xristou en th| parousia| autou; 

 Verse Count

KJV

NAS

 

Matthew

4

1 Corinthians

2

2 Corinthians

3

Philippians

2

1 Thessalonians

4

2 Thessalonians

3

James

2

2 Peter

3

1 John

1

 

Matthew

4

1 Corinthians

2

2 Corinthians

3

Philippians

2

1 Thessalonians

4

2 Thessalonians

3

James

2

2 Peter

3

1 John

 

 

Compare all good dictionaries http://simplebibletruths.net/DictionaryExample.htm

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia

COMING, SECOND

 

 

 

 

 

 

See PAROUSIA.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

First Paragraph Reads

The Second Coming of Christ (a phrase not found in the Bible) is expressed by the apostles in the following special terms:

(1) "Parousia" (parousia), a word fairly common in Greek, with the meaning "presence" (2 Corinthians 10:10; Philippians 2:12). More especially it may mean "presence after absence," "arrival" (but not "return," unless this is given by the context), as in 1 Corinthians 16:17; 2 Corinthians 7:6,7; Philippians 1:26. And still more particularly it is applied to the Coming of Christ in 1 Corinthians 15:23; 1 Thessalonians 2:19; 3:13; 4:15; 5:23; 2 Thessalonians 2:1,8; James 5:7,8; 2 Peter 1:16; 3:4,12; 1 John 2:28--in all 13 times, besides 2 Thessalonians 2:9, where it denotes the coming of Anti-christ. This word for Christ's Second Coming passed into the early Patristic literature (Diognetus, vii.6, e.g.), but its use in this sense is not invariable. For instance the word in Ignatius, Philadelphians, ix.2, means the Incarnation. Or the Incarnation is called the first Parousia, as in Justin, Trypho, xiv. But in modern theology it means invariably the Second Coming. Recent archaeological discoveries have explained why the word received such general Christian use in the special sense. In Hellenistic Greek it was used for the arrival of a ruler at a place, as is evidenced by inscriptions in Egypt, Asia Minor, etc. Indeed, in an Epidaurus inscription of the 3rd century BC (Dittenberger, Sylloge

 

 

2001 Translation

Coming, Presence, or Nearness?

It was just two days before Passover and his death, sometime around midnight, when Jesus and his Apostles left Jerusalem and crossed the Valley of Cedars (Kidron), then walked up the Mount of Olives and sat down in a quiet spot. And as they looked at the marvelous Temple of Jehovah in the light of the full moon, some of his Apostles commented on the magnificence of these buildings. Then Jesus said, ‘Do you see all these things? I tell you the truth, there won’t be a stone left on top of a stone here that won’t be thrown down.’

Then, just after Jesus had foretold the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem (as recorded in Matthew 24, Mark 13, and Luke 21), Jesus’ Apostles asked him to tell them when the thing he had just foretold would happen. It’s important for us to understand exactly what they asked, because this will help us to understand the meaning of his reply better, which has to do (in part) with the coming of the end of the period we’re now living in.

We have three different accounts of these words, one by Matthew (who may have been an eyewitness), and one each by Mark and Luke, who probably heard what Jesus said from the Apostles who were there. And because the words expressed in each case are slightly different, we can see what the Apostles really understood him to mean, not what the words are thought to mean in a single verse.

In Greek, Matthew 24:3 reads, ‘Eipon hemin pote tauta estai kai ti to semion tes ses parousias kai synteleias tou aionos.’ Word-for-word in English, that reads, ‘Say to/us when these will/be and what the sign at/the your nearness and ending the age.’

In Greek, Mark 13:4 reads, ‘Eipon hemin pote tauta estai kai ti to semion hotan melle tauta synteleisthai panta.’ Word-for-word in English, that reads, ‘Say to/us when these will/be and what the sign when may/be/about these ending all.’

In Greek, Luke 21:7 reads, ‘Didaskale, pote oun tauta estai kai to to semion hotan melle tauta ginesthai.’ Word-for-word in English, this reads, ‘Teacher, say therefore these will/be and what the sign when may/be/about these begin.’

We find that the Greek word parousias (which is only used in the Matthew account) is key to understanding what that time-period represents when we find it used in other scriptures. For, that same word is used in the same context at 1 Corinthians 15:23, 1 Thessalonians 2:19, 3:13, 4:15, 5:23, 2 Thessalonians 2:1, 9, James 5:7, 8, 2 Peter 1:16, 3:4, 12, and at 1 John 2:28. So, we suspect that all these scriptures are referring to the same period in time. But, when is that?

Well, some Bibles have translated the word parousias at Matthew 24:3 as coming, but the problem with this is that the Greek word for coming is erchomenon… so that really isn’t the proper translation. However, if you look at the Hebrew and Aramaic texts, you’ll see that the words he spoke in either language translate as coming or arrival. So, although much has been written about the meaning and significance of parousias, that probably wasn't the word that Jesus used, for he likely spoke in Aramaic.

Another Bible translates parousias as presence, which is good, because the English word presence is derived from parousias. So, we would then assume that the Apostles were asking Jesus when he would be present, not just when he was on his way (coming). But is that what the Apostles meant when they asked that question? Not if you read what was written in the accounts of Mark and Luke. For in Mark they asked when these things were about to be, and in Luke they asked what the signs were when it was about to begin. In other words, they were asking what the signs would be when the things that Jesus was foretelling (and of his coming) were about to happen.

As further proof, note that in the Aramaic text of Mark, Jesus is quoted as saying, ‘Tell us when these things will happen and what is the sign that these things are near and all these things will be fulfilled?’ And in Luke he was quoted as saying, ‘When will these things be, and what is the sign that these things are near to happening?

Also, notice Jesus’ words at Matthew 24:33, where he said, ‘Likewise, when you see all these things [happening], know that he’s near – at the doors.’ So, the signs that Jesus gave weren’t the signs of the end, but of when they were ‘about to end.’ And when these signs were seen, Jesus would be ‘near’ and about to ‘come’ (or enter) to bring destruction.

Then, starting at Matthew 24:29, we read of Jesus’ coming (gr. ercomi). These prophecies were never fulfilled during the destruction of Jerusalem, so they must specifically refer to a modern and greater series of events to come upon the whole world. Then throughout the rest of Matthew 24 and 25, Jesus talks about this period of his coming, which appears to apply to the events that include (or lead up to) Armageddon.

So, why is there a difference between the Greek word that was used in the verse in Matthew and those in Mark and Luke, since they were all quoting the same words of Jesus? Well, recognize that all these accounts were written several years after Jesus’ death, and they were quoting what they remembered to be the meaning of his words. Matthew chose to use parousias (meaning  parallel), which really isn’t wrong, because it also means beside, alongside, near, and next to. So, when Matthew wrote parousias, he wasn’t necessarily saying that Jesus is there, but that he is nearby. So, we have translated parousias  as near or nearness in this Bible wherever it is found, for that more closely coincides with the words that Mark and Luke understood Jesus to mean.

When Is Jesus Near?

Notice another interesting difference between the accounts of what the Apostles asked. In Matthew, the question was more complex, for they not only asked when he would be near, but when the age would end. However, in Mark and Luke they were just asking when the Temple would be destroyed. And Luke in particular recorded just the signs of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem.

Yet, the accounts in Matthew and Mark went on to describe things that didn’t happen when Jerusalem and the Temple were destroyed in 70-C.E. What things? The actual coming (gr. erchomenon) of Jesus, when the skies become dark and great signs are seen (Matthew 24:29, 30, and Mark 13:24-27). This appears to be what all the signs that he gave of his nearness (nation rising against nations, famines, earthquakes, etc.) were leading up to.

Now, in the case of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Temple, most of the signs that Jesus gave did in fact happen toward the latter half of the First Century. So could we say that Jesus was near then? Yes, he must have played an active role in the destruction of Jerusalem, because that’s what he said in his prophecy. That this assumption is true can be seen in Jesus’ instructions to his Apostles when he first sent them out to preach. Notice what a short period is implied in his words found at Matthew 10:23; ‘When they persecute you in this city, run to another. Because, I tell you the truth, you may not call on all the cities of Israel before the Son of Man arrives.

But were those things to have a greater fulfillment in the future… possibly in our day?

Many Bible scholars have concluded that the answer is no, and that the prophecy was completely fulfilled on Jerusalem in 70-C.E., because Luke’s account seems to verify that idea. And for a fact, most of the prophecies were fulfilled when that city was destroyed. Yet, those who disagree with this view refer back to the same question Jesus’ Apostles asked, to prove there will be a future fulfillment. For other Bibles quote the Apostles as asking, ‘What will be the signs of your coming and the end of the world?’ And since ‘the world’ hasn’t ended yet, they argue that Jesus’ prophecy has still to be fulfilled completely.

And while we agree with the belief that there will be a greater fulfillment of this prophecy, their argument isn’t totally valid, because Jesus didn’t actually say anything about the end of the world. If you go back and read the Greek words, you'll see that he didn’t speak of the end of the cosmos (world), but of the end of the aionos (age… a word that those same Bibles also wrongly translate as forever).

And though the age of Jewish worship at the Temple in Jerusalem did end in 70-C.E., we think that that the nearness of Jesus will have a second fulfillment because of what is said at Revelation 6:2-7, where we read, ‘And at that {Look!} I saw a white horse, and the one who was sitting on it had a bow. He was given a crown and he came to conquer and to complete his victory… a fire-red horse came out, and … he was authorized to take peace away from the earth … a black horse … a greenish-yellow horse … and the grave came following him.’

This familiar scripture, which was written almost thirty years after the destruction of Jerusalem, was obviously speaking of some then-future event, and it foretold the same things that Jesus foretold in Matthew 24, a period marked by war, famine, sickness, and death. So we must conclude that Jesus’ prophecy does have a future (and global) fulfillment. But when?

For an answer to this, we look to another scripture in Revelation, this time in the Twelfth Chapter. For in verses seven through twelve we read of the beginning of hard times for the earth, and of the start of something new for Jesus. Could this be his nearness? It says, ‘Next, war broke out in heaven. Michael and his messengers went to war against the dragon, and the dragon and his messengers fought back; but he lost and could no longer stay in heaven. So, the huge dragon was thrown out. He is the first snake, the one who is called the Slanderer and Opposer, who is leading the whole earth astray. He was thrown down to the earth along with his messengers. Then I heard a loud voice in heaven say, This is the moment when the salvation, the power, the Kingdom of our God, and the authorization of his Anointed One begins …  But woe to the earth and the sea, because the Slanderer has come down to you in a rage, knowing that he only has a short time left.’

Now, we know that the things mentioned in this scripture didn’t happen in the past, because, as we were told at the beginning of the Revelation, that it was a vision of what would happen ‘in the Lord’s Day.’ And the fact that the Slanderer has only a short time to create woe on the earth indicates that this too is a prophecy of our day.

So, when will (or did) that prophecy start to be fulfilled? Well, at the end of the terrible First World War, as famine and death were raging throughout Europe, and after he started to see the horrible plague of Spanish Influenza killing millions throughout the earth, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson was heard to comment that this all looked like ‘the ride of the four horsemen of the Apocalypse.’

Was he right? If he was, that great period of woe for the earth (and the start of Jesus’ nearness) must have begun somewhere around 1913-1914. And if that is so, we’re now living in that ‘short time’ when the Slanderer is raging among us.

The Reason Why Some Disagree

Yet, despite the fact that we have three Bible accounts testifying to and explaining the meaning of Jesus’ presence or nearness, we continue to receive correspondence proclaiming that our conclusions are wrong… and since we claim no infallibility, we admit that we could in fact be wrong.

However, there are several emotional issues that have clouded the meaning of Jesus’ words, for one religious group has stumped the world proclaiming that Jesus ‘came’ in Kingdom power in 1914. So, they preach that his ‘coming’ has already happened and that he is now ‘present,’ which has upset and confused many people. Is their conclusion correct?

Well, they seem to have put the cart before the horse, because, although Jesus spoke first of his being near (at the doors), and thereafter speaks of his coming (entry through the doors), they say (for example) that the ‘faithful and discreet slave’ of Matthew 25 was identified early in the 20th Century, and that was the time of his coming, which is simultaneous with his presence. Confusing? Yes!

What the account of Revelation 12 does say is that, when God’s Kingdom and the authority of His Anointed One to rule begins, this would be signified by a period of ‘woe’ for the earth. So, the heavenly portion of the establishment of God’s Kingdom apparently begins near the start of ‘the Day of the Lord,’ and perhaps that’s the time when Jesus is (in fact) ‘near – at the doors,’ and about to bring the end of the age.

However, there’s no way that we could refer to this period as Jesus’ coming, for the account in Matthew speaks of his coming as the time when ‘the sun will grow dark, the moon won’t put out light, the stars will fall from the sky, and the powers of the Heavens will shake… the sign of the Son of Man will appear in the sky and all the tribes of the earth will beat themselves in grief when they see the Son of Man coming on the clouds in the sky with power and great glory.’

So, saying that Jesus has ‘come’ is very misleading and technically wrong, and there is no reason to believe the things that follow in the account in Matthew (the identifying of the faithful, wise slave, for example) has happened. For more information, see the linked documents, ‘Armageddon – When?’ and ‘The Faithful and Sensible Slave.’

We have also received a link to a document that argues against the conclusions we’ve reached above. If you are interested in reading an alternate viewpoint, you may find it at http://uk.geocities.com/i_witnessing/articles/presence_or_coming.html.

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From (http://www.2001translation.com/Presence.htm):